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1969 Opel CD

Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
The Opel Design team with the Opel CD concept which was shown at the 1969 Frankfurt Motor Show (Chuck Jordan third from right)
The Opel Design team with the Opel CD concept which was shown at the 1969 Frankfurt Motor Show (Chuck Jordan third from right)
Opel CD, 1969 - Chuck Jordan
Opel CD, 1969 - Chuck Jordan
Opel CD, 1969 - Chuck Jordan
Opel CD, 1969 - Chuck Jordan
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969 - Interior
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Photo: Thomas von Salomon
Opel CD, 1969 - Design process
Opel CD, 1969 - Design process
Opel CD - 1:5 scale model (1 of 4), March 1969
Opel CD - 1:5 scale model (1 of 4), March 1969
Opel CD - Fiberglass body
Opel CD - Fiberglass body
Chuck Jordan in the Opel CD seating buck
Chuck Jordan in the Opel CD seating buck
Opel CD, 1969 - Design sketch
Opel CD, 1969 - Design sketch
Opel CD - Rendering
Opel CD - Rendering
Bilder: GM; autozeitung.de; www.alt-opel.eu
Bewertung:  87    -54    +141
Opel CD (Coupé Diplomat), 1969
Огромное лобовое стекло вместе с дверьми поднимается вперед, открывая доступ в салон. Это - Opel CD Сoncept. Таким виделся спорткар будущего немецким дизайнерам в далеком 1969-м.


The Opel CD was designed under the control of Charles M Jordan, and was first shown at the 1969 Frankfurt Motor Show on September the 9th. The Opel CD (Coupé Diplomat) featured a one-piece "greenhouse" windscreen and side windows with integrated doors, which pivoted forward to access the cabin. The Opel CD was based on an Opel Diplomat and featured the 5354cc Opel Diplomat engine.

www.lotusespritturbo.com


1969, Opel CD – the next bull's eye: Encouraged by the positive public response to the Experimental GT and the great market success of the series production GT, Opel designers in Research and Advanced Design concentrated on designing visionary coupés and sports cars. In 1969, the Opel Design Team under the leadership of Charles “Chuck” M. Jordan hit its next bull’s eye at the IAA in Frankfurt – the Opel CD. This luxury, two-seat coupé with a V8 engine was based on the Diplomat (CD = Coupé Diplomat) and conceived from the outset – as people say today – as a concept car not intended for series production.

It was, instead, intended to provide a look ahead to the development of cars in the 1970s, and to clearly indicate the future path of Opel design. With the elegant CD, measuring just 1.11 meters in height, Opel designers again managed to appeal to people’s hearts and minds. Its clean styling, with a “wraparound” windshield without A-pillars which opened up like the canopy of a fighter jet, whetted people’s appetite. On the other hand, the operating concept, with its firmly installed seats and the individually-adjustable cockpit (pedals, steering wheel, instrument panel), demonstrated the technological precision of German engineering.

opelpost.com


Vision

The Opel CD (Coupé Diplomat) was the star of the IAA in Frankfurt in 1969. A thoroughbred Gran Turismo based on Opel Diplomat technology, the Candy Apple Red Opel CD featured a canopy-like cockpit opening that replaced conventional doors. It was a convincing showcase of the Opel designers’ skill and ambition. A few years later other European competitors also began to develop and present concept vehicles themselves.

Technology

The Opel CD was designed under the control of Charles M Jordan and featured a one-piece "greenhouse" windscreen and side windows with integrated doors, which pivoted forward hydraulically to allow access to the cabin. The steering column and steering wheel pivoted up as well. This concept was also further developed and ultimately built in low-volume production.

Exterior

Built as a styling study, the Opel design team perfected the aerodynamics of the Opel CD in extensive wind tunnel testing. This is the norm in automotive design today, but it was a quite innovative in the late 1960s. The sleek front end with retractable headlamps flows seamlessly into the wrap-around windscreen constructed without the visual blockage of a roof pillar.

Interior

A roomy and comfortable two-seater, the Coupé Diplomat featured finely upholstered leather club seats. The steering column with the attached instrument panel and the pedals were fully adjustable and could be re-positioned for optimal ergonomics. Special attention was paid to ergonomics in this study as well as a futuristic car telephone conveniently located in the sleek center console.

www.opel.com


You could be forgiven for assuming this svelte concept hails from Italy, especially given its appearance of a smoothened Lamborghini Espada. However, it came not from Bertone’s Turinese atelier – but rather Opel’s studio in the slightly less glamorous city of Russelsheim, Germany…

We all know what Bryan Adams was doing in the summer of ’69. But while the Canadian was taking delivery of his first real six-string, Opel’s new design director George Gallion was settling into the company’s new German studio, penning something that even the coachbuilders located 500 miles south would have been proud of.

Sparked by a Stuttgart supercar

The role of the new styling centre in Russelsheim – an exact copy of GM’s site in Michigan, albeit on a smaller scale – was to develop a recognisable design language for the brand. First came the Experimental GT then, in 1969, Gallion et al created the Coupé Diplomat concept as a response to the Mercedes C111 that was rumoured to be debuting at that year’s motor show in the neighbouring city of Frankfurt.

Taking the 5.4-litre V8 and associated mechanicals from the traditionally styled Opel Diplomat, Gallion topped them with sumptuous candy red bodywork. The simple lines formed a work of art by themselves – but the focal point was the glass canopy that lifted forward in a single piece, incorporating windscreen, roof, side windows and doors. As such, it was free of vision-obscuring A-pillars, but the preferred viewpoint undoubtedly remained on the outside, admiring the car's external lines.

Left with a Bitter taste

A healthy reception at Frankfurt led to GM commissioning Pietro Frua to develop two production-realistic (i.e. sans-canopy) prototypes, but ultimately it was former racing driver Erich Bitter that took up the real-world reins of the idea. He created a new company specifically to market the CD (with production subcontracted to Baur), though by this time a little of the car’s charm had been lost in the design translation.

In its original form, the CD is remembered as Opel’s most beautiful concept car. Not only did it inspire one man to invest a fortune into making it more widely available – it also proved to other European manufacturers that the path to simplistic beauty needn’t necessarily originate in Italy.

Joe Breeze - www.classicdriver.com
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