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1985 Saab EV-1

Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985 - Glass roof with solar cells
Saab EV-1, 1985 - Glass roof with solar cells
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985
Saab EV-1, 1985 - Interior
Saab EV-1, 1985 - Interior
Saab EV-1, 1985 - Cutaway
Saab EV-1, 1985 - Cutaway
Bilder: Saab Automobile
Bewertung:  55    -16    +71
1985 Saab 900 Turbo 16 EV-1 (Experimental Vehicle One)
Saab EV-1, or Saab 900 Turbo EV-1, was developed by Saab in 1985 as a fully functional and roadworthy future design study (EV-1 stands for Experimental Vehicle One). It was a sports coupé body style based on the Saab 900 Turbo 16v. The design was made by Björn Envall and included such features as a solar powered interior fan with solar cells mounted in the glass roof. The front and rear was made of Aramid reinforced fiberglass.

Most of the parts were from the Saab 900 Turbo 16 and modified, but the seats came from a Chevrolet Corvette. The engine was tuned to give 285 hp (213 kW). The top speed was 270 km/h and 0 to 100 km/h was done in 5.9 seconds. An interesting feature is that the speedometer lights only iluminate the area around the current speed. A feature incorporated as standard on later production models. An EV-1 can be seen in the background of Back to the Future Part II.


In 1985, Saab had the world at its feet: the 900 was popular with doctors, pharmacists and architects – while the 9000’s life had just begun, its sights set firmly on the acclaimed BMW 5 Series. Then, contrary to expectations, Saab unveiled a revolutionary design study. It was based on the underpinnings of the proven 900 Turbo, but was blessed with a sleek body and the designation ‘EV-1’ – standing for ‘Experimental Vehicle’, rather than today’s more usual meaning (electric vehicle).

Not since the company’s early years had there been a Swede so svelte – the design being an artifact from the pen of in-house designer Björn Envall, who incidentally fabricated the first clay model of the EV-1 on his kitchen table. The profile of the prototype garnered much attention at its launch at the 1985 Frankfurt Motor Show but it may have reaped more had it been known that, functionally, it was to be the last ‘true’ Saab. EV-1 was produced as a fully working car but had some interesting innovations: extremities were constructed of bump-resistant Kevlar-aramid composite, while the glassfibre doors had carbonfibre inserts nestled inside, acting as lightweight side-impact protection beams.

The EV-1’s modernity continued above its waistline: the roof was made entirely of bronze-tinted, heat-resistant glass embedded with solar cells – the latter of which powered an interior cooling fan, a concept revisited by the latest Audi A8. Only the narrow A-pillar and less-narrow, chassis-reinforcing targa bar thwarted a panoramic view of the outside world, though their blackened state gave the car a futuristic appearance. A host of other electrical innovations were present, including a speedometer which only lit the digits showing the current speed; a feature used in later production Saabs.

The mechanicals, however, were proven. Following Saab tradition, the 282bhp was sent to the front wheels, originating from an inline, turbocharged 1985cc. A speed ceiling of 168mph – combined with the respectable 5.9-second 0-62mph sprint time – put EV-1 in the same performance league as a Ferrari Testarossa, an impressive achievement for a car with a third of the cylinders and a considerable displacement handicap. But then that was Saab in its prime: an innovative, forward-thinking company that challenged current assumptions.

Despite this, Saab never found a case for a production version of the EV-1, meaning it remained merely the subject of glossy magazine pages and trade show floors. But while the fate of its creator is sealed, the EV-1 prototype is still open to resolution: it will be auctioned off as part of the liquidation of the Saab Heritage Museum inventory.


Шведский концепт, построенный в 1985 году на доработанных агрегатах Saab 900. Впервые его показали на автосалоне в Лос-Анджелесе. Форсированный 4-цилиндровый двигатель развивал 285 л.с., что обеспечивало максимальную скорость 270 км/ч и разгон с места до 100 км/ч за 5,9 с

Четырехместное купе было интересно своей стеклянной крышей c набором солнечных батарей, которые в жаркую погоду охлаждали салон припаркованной на солнце машины. Бампера были из АБС-пластика, который восстанавливался после мелких повреждений. Сиденья позаимствовали от Шевроле Корвета.

Интересно также, что на на шкале спидометра отображались только те риски, которые были близки к текущей скорости. Такое решение впоследствии появилось и на серийных моделях марки (система Night Panel).

Кстати, машина появлялась в Back To The Future II
Quelle: Saabo.com; Joe Breeze - www.classicdriver.com
Kommentare
jsn
Sonntag, 11. Oktober 2009
wtf
baptiste
Freitag, 11. Mai 2012
On dirais la ACTIVA concept de CITROEN.
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