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BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy

BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy - Paris'57
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy - Paris'57
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy - Coachwork by Pinchon-Parat
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy - Coachwork by Pinchon-Parat
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy with his BMW in Saint-Tropez
BMW 507 (1957): Raymond Loewy with his BMW in Saint-Tropez
Bilder: carcatalog1.free.fr; www.zwischengas.com; www.motortrend.com; www.bmwism.com
Bewertung:  0    -6    +6
Designed by Raymond Loewy
Coachwork by Pichon-Parat
The production model BMW 507 roadster was designed by Albrecht Graf Goertz — not Raymond Loewy. Even though post-war Europe's economy was in a shambles, Max Hoffmann, America's biggest import car dealer of that time, persuaded the BMW board that this kind of model was what BMW needed. Hoffmann then urged Count Albrecht Graf Goertz to submit sketches to the BMW board and these were enthusiastically received. Goertz was commissioned to design the BMW roadster and BMW craftsman completed the 507 prototype in time to wow attendees at the 1955 Frankfurt Motor Show. Goertz met Raymond Loewy in New York and was offered a job at Loewy Associates. Loewy later designed a BMW prototype that was displayed at the 1957 Paris Auto Show, but was never produced. The coke bottle curves used so successfully on the Avanti were also evident on both BMW designs.

Loewy has designed, or managed the design of, some great-looking work over time, including several groundbreaking Studebakers. But most would agree that this wasn't among his better efforts. There are a few interesting elements, and the dual rectangular headlights foretold the look employed on most American cars in the 1970s. But the rest is a bit overstyled, if not downright strange.
Quelle: www.theavanti.net; www.motortrend.com
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