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Gallery of the American Automobile (1853–1915): Illustrations by Clarence P. Hornung

1853 Dudgeon Steam Wagon
1853 Dudgeon Steam Wagon
1863 Roper Steam Carriage
1863 Roper Steam Carriage
1871 Carhart Steam Wagon
1871 Carhart Steam Wagon
1877 Selden Road Wagon
1877 Selden Road Wagon
1886 Copeland Steam Tricycle
1886 Copeland Steam Tricycle
1890 Morrison-Sturgis Electric
1890 Morrison-Sturgis Electric
1891 Lambert Gasoline Buggy
1891 Lambert Gasoline Buggy
1891 Nadig Road Wagon
1891 Nadig Road Wagon
1892 Schloemer-Toepfer Carriage
1892 Schloemer-Toepfer Carriage
1893 Black Gasoline Carriage
1893 Black Gasoline Carriage
1893 Duryea Gasoline Buggy
1893 Duryea Gasoline Buggy
1894 Haynes Gasoline Carriage
1894 Haynes Gasoline Carriage
1895 Duryea Motor Wagon
1895 Duryea Motor Wagon
1895 Holtzer-Cabot Electric
1895 Holtzer-Cabot Electric
1895 Morris & Salom Electrobat
1895 Morris & Salom Electrobat
1896 Ford's Quadricycle
1896 Ford's Quadricycle
1896 King Horseless Carriage
1896 King Horseless Carriage
1897 Mueller Motor Carriage
1897 Mueller Motor Carriage
1897 Olds Motor Carriage
1897 Olds Motor Carriage
1898 Autocar Phaeton
1898 Autocar Phaeton
1898 Ford Gasoline Carriage
1898 Ford Gasoline Carriage
1898 Riker Electric Tricycle
1898 Riker Electric Tricycle
1898 Winton Motor Carriage
1898 Winton Motor Carriage
1898 Woods Electric Hansom
1898 Woods Electric Hansom
1899 Columbia Daumon Victoria
1899 Columbia Daumon Victoria
1899 Knox Three-Wheeler
1899 Knox Three-Wheeler
1899 Locomobile Steamer
1899 Locomobile Steamer
1899 Packard Model "A"
1899 Packard Model "A"
1900 Columbia Electric Phaeton
1900 Columbia Electric Phaeton
1900 Riker Electric Brougham
1900 Riker Electric Brougham
1900 Woods Station Wagon
1900 Woods Station Wagon
1901 Haynes-Apperson Surrey
1901 Haynes-Apperson Surrey
1901 Riker Theatre Bus
1901 Riker Theatre Bus
1901 White Steamer
1901 White Steamer
1902 Duryea Phaeton
1902 Duryea Phaeton
1902 Franklin Runabout
1902 Franklin Runabout
1902 Packard "F" Tonneau
1902 Packard "F" Tonneau
1902 Rambler Runabout
1902 Rambler Runabout
1902 Stanley Steamer
1902 Stanley Steamer
1902 Studebaker Electric Runabout
1902 Studebaker Electric Runabout
1903 Cadillac Tonneau
1903 Cadillac Tonneau
1903 Ford "A" Tonneau
1903 Ford "A" Tonneau
1903 Oldsmobile Curved Dash Runabout
1903 Oldsmobile Curved Dash Runabout
1903 Peerless Touring Car
1903 Peerless Touring Car
1903 Winton Touring Car
1903 Winton Touring Car
1904 Locomobile Tonneau de Luxe
1904 Locomobile Tonneau de Luxe
1904 Rambler Tonneau
1904 Rambler Tonneau
1904 Studebaker Touring Car
1904 Studebaker Touring Car
1905 Cadillac "D" Touring Car
1905 Cadillac "D" Touring Car
1905 Ford "B" Touring Car
1905 Ford "B" Touring Car
1905 Holsman Surrey
1905 Holsman Surrey
1906 Autocar Runabout
1906 Autocar Runabout
1906 Cadillac 'M' Touring Car
1906 Cadillac 'M' Touring Car
1906 Ford "K" Touring Car
1906 Ford "K" Touring Car
1906 Marmon "D" Touring Car
1906 Marmon "D" Touring Car
1906 Packard "S 24"Victoria
1906 Packard "S 24"Victoria
1906 Stearns Limousine "40-45"
1906 Stearns Limousine "40-45"
1907 Apperson Touring Car
1907 Apperson Touring Car
1907 Buick "G" Runabout
1907 Buick "G" Runabout
1907 Cadillac "H" Limousine
1907 Cadillac "H" Limousine
1907 Maxwell Tourabout
1907 Maxwell Tourabout
1907 Oldsmobile "A" Touring Car
1907 Oldsmobile "A" Touring Car
1907-Pope Waverly "60 A" Surrey
1907-Pope Waverly "60 A" Surrey
1907 S & M Simplex Limousine
1907 S & M Simplex Limousine
1908 Pierce Great Arrow Touring
1908 Pierce Great Arrow Touring
1908 Rauch & Lang Brougham
1908 Rauch & Lang Brougham
1908 Stanley Roadster
1908 Stanley Roadster
1909 Ford Model "T" Touring Car
1909 Ford Model "T" Touring Car
1909 Knox "M" Limousine
1909 Knox "M" Limousine
1909 Studebaker "A" Suburban
1909 Studebaker "A" Suburban
1909 Thomas Flyer Touring Car
1909 Thomas Flyer Touring Car
1910 Buick "10" Toy Tonneau
1910 Buick "10" Toy Tonneau
1910 Chalmers-Detroit Coupe
1910 Chalmers-Detroit Coupe
1910 Hudson Roadster
1910 Hudson Roadster
1910 Oakland "K" Touring Car
1910 Oakland "K" Touring Car
1910 Packard Berline
1910 Packard Berline
1910 Reo Roadster
1910 Reo Roadster
1910 Sears Motor Buggy
1910 Sears Motor Buggy
1911 Alco Touring Car
1911 Alco Touring Car
1911 Brewster Limousine
1911 Brewster Limousine
1911 Buick "26" Runabout
1911 Buick "26" Runabout
1911 Matheson Toy Tonneau
1911 Matheson Toy Tonneau
1911 Mercer Raceabout
1911 Mercer Raceabout
1911 Rambler Landaulet
1911 Rambler Landaulet
1911 White "30" Landaulet
1911 White "30" Landaulet
1912 Abbott-Detroit Roadster
1912 Abbott-Detroit Roadster
1912 Lozier Toy Tonneau
1912 Lozier Toy Tonneau
1912 Packard "30" Close-Coupled
1912 Packard "30" Close-Coupled
1912 Simplex Speedster
1912 Simplex Speedster
1913 American "22-B" Roadster
1913 American "22-B" Roadster
1913 Cadillac Coupe
1913 Cadillac Coupe
1913 Overland "69" Touring Car
1913 Overland "69" Touring Car
1913 Peerless Roadster
1913 Peerless Roadster
1914 Chevrolet-Baby Grand Touring
1914 Chevrolet-Baby Grand Touring
1914 Chevrolet Royal Mail Roadster
1914 Chevrolet Royal Mail Roadster
1914 Dodge Touring Car
1914 Dodge Touring Car
1914 Hupmobile "32" Touring Car
1914 Hupmobile "32" Touring Car
1914 Pierce-Arrow Vestibule Suburban
1914 Pierce-Arrow Vestibule Suburban
1914 Stutz Bearcat
1914 Stutz Bearcat
1915 Locomobile Town Coupe
1915 Locomobile Town Coupe
Bilder: Clarence P. Hornung
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Рисунки ранних американских автомобилей за авторством Кларенса Хорнунга (Clarence P. Hornung) выглядят как современная "векторная графика", вот только нарисованы эти иллюстрации были задолго до появления компьютерного искусства как такового.

Любопытно сравнить их с тем, как подавали эту тему Лесли Заальбург (Leslie Saalburg) и художники, иллюстрировавшие серию календарей "Величайшие моменты ранней американской автомобильной истории" (Great Moments in Early American Motoring).


Gallery of the American Automobile set by Clarence P. Hornung was printed in 1965. This set contains 100 lithographs of historic American automobiles. Hornung began his auto illustrations in 1949, after he learned that there was no pictorial history of American cars. Hornung was nicknamed "The Audubon of the Automobile".

The colored lithographs illustrate the development of the automobile in the United States from 1853 to 1915 from the 1853 Dudgeon Steam Wagon through the 1915 Locomobile Town Coupe. Each vehicle is lavishly reproduced as a color screenprint, with a separate explanatory caption provided by James J. Bradley - then the head of the Automotive History Collection at the Detroit Public Library.

Knox Three Wheeler, 1899
The 1899 car designed by Harry A. Knox of Springfield, Mass. boasted several noteworthy features. It had a wish-bone shaped, angle-iron frame that was one of the sturdiest of its day. It also had the distinction of being one of the first cars to use an air-cooled engine.

Riker Electric Brougham, 1900
On April 14, 1900, a Riker machine defeated 9 other vehicles in the Merrick road race on Long Island with an average speed of about 25 miles per hour. The Broughams were the most luxurious of their entire line and were made on special order for customers in London, Paris and the U.S.

Haynes-Apperson Surrey, 1901
Elwood Haynes (1857 -1925) was an American inventor, metallurgist, automotive pioneer, entrepreneur, and industrialist. designed one of the earliest automobiles made in the United States and is recognized for having created the earliest American design that was feasible for mass production. With the Apperson brothers, he formed the first company in the United States to produce automobiles profitably. He made many advances in the automotive industry.

Duryea Phaeton, 1902
With a rating of 10 h.p., the engine could produce speeds up to 25 mph. Its power was transmitted directly to the live rear axle by chain drive and an efficient, 14-inch, expanding type brake was fitted on the sprocket on the differential gear to insure safe stopping.

Packard "F" Tonneau, 1902
The Model F marked the emergence of the Packard from the buggy to the automobile type. In their 1902 catalog, the company frankly acknowledged the 'popular clamor for multiple cylinder engines placed upright in front.' However, they defended their single-cylinder, 12 h.p. engine, hung under the driver's seat, on the grounds that it was easy to get at. provided sufficient power and superior handling because of better weight distribution.

Rambler Runabout, 1902
Like so many of the early auto pioneers, Thomas B. Jeffery was first a builder of bicycles. His Rambler automobile, introduced at the Chicago show of 1902, measured seven feet in length, weighed 1500 pounds and listed at $750.00, f.o.b Kenosha, Wis.

Stanley Steamer, 1902
The Stanley Brothers were shrewd Yankee 'horse-traders' as well as mechanical wizards. Their first car had appeared in 1897. It was so successful that shortly thereafter Locomobile interests bought their factory and patents for $250,000. In 1902 the Stanleys re-entered the steam car field with a redesigned model which rendered the Locomobile almost obsolete.

Studebaker Electric Runabout, 1902
Studebaker's carriage experience was particularly in evidence in the design of the body of their 1902 runabout. Its angular lines were severely simple yet smart; it was well upholstered with choices of fine quality leather, cloth or whipcord. Particular care had been taken to provide adequate leg-room and a 28 1/2inch floor level made for ease of entry or exit.

Ford "A" Tonneau, 1903
On June 16, 1903, a dozen daring stockholders invested $28,000 to form the Ford Motor Company. Their first sale of an automobile, less than a month later, was the beginning of one of the most fabulous industrial developments in the history of motordom. The car was called the Model "A" and appealed to the public immediately. It sold for $950, a price well under most of its competition.

Peerless Touring Car, 1903
The Peerless Motor Car Company of Cleveland was another of the many early pioneer firms whose bicycle-making experience led them into the automobile field. By 1903 they had advanced from small motorettes which clearly reflected their bicycle heritage to machines that were world-renowned for their performances in hill climbing contests and racing events.

Locomobile Tonneau de Luxe, 1904
In its 26 years, from 1903 to 1929, Locomobile produced steam and gasoline cars which are still remembered for their speed, luxury, and excellence of design. The 1904 'D' Tonneau De Luxe had been developed by A. L. Riker and was closely fashioned after the German Mercedes Simplex.

Rambler Tonneau, 1904
Though unusually high and somewhat boxy in appearance, the 1904 Rambler Tonneau was still an exceedingly attractive automobile. Its gracefully curving mud-guards, the sparkle of well-polished brass lamps (oil on the sides, acetylene gas in the front) and the soft gleam of its rich, buttoned-leather upholstery were pleasing to the eye.

Studebaker Touring Car, 1904
In the year 1904, the Studebaker Brothers who had for half a century been famous builders of fine carriages and wagons, sold their first gasoline car to a customer at the gates of their South Bend plant. In 1904 Studebaker also produced electric traps, phaetons, stanhopes, runabouts, trucks, etc.

Cadillac "D" Touring Car, 1905
The Cadillac Model D was introduced in January 1905. It was a larger automobile than previous Cadillac offerings and their first four-cylinder production model. Priced at $2,800. It is considered to as the first luxury car from the company.

Holsman Surrey, 1905
High wheeler, or auto buggy manufacturers flourished in the first decade of the 20th century when the deeply rutted and muddy country roads made a vehicle with narrow wheels, 3 to 4 feet high, seem quite advantageous. The Holsman Automobile Company of Chicago in offering their 1905 line was able to advance another cogent argument. They maintained that the general construction of their body and chassis was so similar to horsedrawn vehicles that local wheelwrights and wagon shops could make repairs.

Cadillac "M" Touring Car, 1906
This was a reliable two-cycle, 10 h.p. motor mounted under the body. It was relatively light at 1350 pounds as well as relatively inexpensive, costing $950.00

Marmon "D" Touring Car, 1906
Nordyke & Marmon set up in Indianapolis in 1876 as milling machinery manufacturers. Their first car was designed by Howard Marmon in 1902; by 1906 the company was able to turn out a machine which finished the 1200-mile Glidden Tour with a perfect score. The Model 'D' touring body was made of cast aluminum and featured a V-4 engine, advertised as 'a mechanical masterpiece.

Stearns Limousine "40-45", 1906
Gallery of the American Automobile." "The F. B. Stearns Company of Cleveland, Ohio is fondly remembered as the producer of some of America's most handsome and luxurious cars for over a quarter of a century (1900-1929). The Chauffeur-driven, French-type limousine was made of cast aluminum. It cost $5200 and in deference to the individual tastes of the purchasers, a wide option of colors was permitted.

Buick "G" Runabout, 1907
David Dunbar Buick (1854-1929), pioneer American automobile manufacturer, after whom the Buick line of automobiles is named. His first independent business venture was a company that made plumbing equipment, started in 1884. In about 1899 he became interested in gasoline engines for agricultural and marine purposes, and in 1902 he formed the Buick Manufacturing Company with the aim of producing engines for automobiles. He built his first automobile in early 1903. The company was later incorporated with General Motors.

Maxwell Tourabout, 1907
There is little doubt that Maxwell was among the best of the early small cars. It was well made, a good performer within its limited range, simple in its mechanical details and outstandingly reliable. Maxwells were first manufactured in Tarrytown, N. Y. in 1904. Commencing with 1913, operations were removed to Detroit and in 1925 the Maxwell name was dropped, to emerge a year later as the Chrysler '50.' The Tourabout had a 72-inch wheelbase and carried sufficient fuel, water and oil for a 100-mile race.

Pope Waverly "60 A" Surrey, 1907
Colonel Albert A. Pope, a former bicycle manufacturer, was one of the earliest car-makers to grasp the concept of trying to offer a varied line of automobiles to the public. For those who might prefer electrics, he could offer this Pope-Waverley made in Indianapolis. The surrey was a handsome machine which well illustrates what a really short step the electric vehicle was from the horse-drawn carriage in 1907.

Rauch & Lang Brougham, 1908
Between 1896 and 1928 at least 54 makes of electric cars were offered for sale to the American public. The last survivor, the Detroit Electric, held out until almost the beginning of World War II. Of the estimated 50,000 electric carriages made in America, almost 14,000 were produced by Rauch and Lang of Cleveland.

Stanley Roadster, 1908
The Stanley Motor Carriage Company was an American manufacturer of steam-engine vehicles; it operated from 1902 to 1924.

Ford Model "T" Touring Car, 1909
In October 1908 the first of 15 million Model T's that were to be built took to the road. By the time production had ceased in 1927, the Ford "T" had brought fame and fortune to its maker and had easily become the most famous car in the world.

Thomas Flyer Touring Car, 1909
Man's imagination was truly ignited in 1908 by the remarkable feat of a stock six-cylinder Thomas Flyer car. In a globe-girdling race from New York to Paris, it had triumphed over the most rigorous tests conceivable. By crossing the finish line well ahead of the five other formidable entries - all from Europe - it proved conclusively that America could produce automobiles that were equal to any in the world.

Buick "10" Toy Tonneau, 1910
The Buick model '10' was introduced in 1908, the same year Buick Motor Company became the cornerstone of the newly formed General Motors organization. By 1910 the model had proven to be Buick's 'bread and butter' car.

Cadillac Coupe, 1913
In 1913 Cadillac won the internationally famed Dewar Trophy for the second time as a result of its pioneering in electrical starting, lighting, and ignition. The self-starter was a milestone for the entire industry inasmuch as it served to double the number of potential drivers; now women could operate a car without the hazards of cranking. Another growing trend which was certain to capture the female eye was the smartly-styled enclosed coupe.

Peerless Roadster, 1913
The Peerless Motor Company was an American automobile manufacturer based in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1900 to 1931.

Hupmobile "32" Touring Car, 1914
Designed and created by Robert C. Hupp. "When this "32" touring model appeared in 1914, the company had dealerships throughout the U.S., a factory in Canada and a five-acre plant in Detroit."
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