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Hispano Suiza: Аисты истребители

Hispano-Suiza J12 Cabriolet (1935) - Photo: Michael Furman
Hispano-Suiza J12 Cabriolet (1935) - Photo: Michael Furman
Hispano-Suiza K6 (1937) - Hood ornament
Hispano-Suiza K6 (1937) - Hood ornament
Hispano-Suiza H6C (1924) - Hood ornament
Hispano-Suiza H6C (1924) - Hood ornament
Hispano-Suiza Boulogne (1922) - Hood ornament
Hispano-Suiza Boulogne (1922) - Hood ornament
Hispano-Suiza H6C advertising poster with the marque’s trademark stork flying overhead
Hispano-Suiza H6C advertising poster with the marque’s trademark stork flying overhead
Spad S VII - Illustration: Shigeo Koike
Spad S VII - Illustration: Shigeo Koike
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С пробки радиатора "испано-сюизы" в небеса взмывает аист - так компания увековечила память о знаменитом французском асе Жорже Гинеме, погибшем во время Первой мировой войны. Капитан Гинеме командовал эскадрильей, истребители которой несли на своем борту эмблему летящего аиста (символ Эльзаса и Лотарингии), а внутри каждого самолета билось многоцилиндровое "сердце" от Hispano-Suiza.


The car makers, who had initially cold-shouldered this development, started to take a dim view of the whole affair. Rolls Royce in particular no longer intended to stand by and watch the head of the radiator on their luxury cars being desecrated by grotesque kitsch. The company commissioned the famous painter and sculptor, Charles Sykes, to create the silver lady that even today graces every Rolls Royce radiator.

One of these was Francois Bazin, his “Flying Stork” (La Cigogne) adorning Hispano Suiza radiators (the Spanish Hispano Suiza marque produced cars between 1904 and 1924). Today, hardly any originals of the stork with elegant flowing curves survive.


After WWI, all Hispano-Suizas famously carried a “flying stork” radiator cap. Whatever for?

Recall Birkigt’s famed watercooled monobloc SOHC aluminum V8 engine with integral heads and screw-in cylinder liners. By the end of the war this engine had been manufactured in no fewer than 21 plants–fourteen in France alone, and others in England, Italy and the US; more than 50,000 were built, and the Hispano-Suiza name was soon legend across Europe. (It was so successful that the French government later sued the company for war profiteering.)

The flying stork (La Cigogne Volante, for you Francophiles) radiator cap was a quiet reminder of the marque’s wartime prowess: it commemorated Group de Combat No. 12, the squadron of Georges Guynemer, a French air ace with 53 credited kills before his disappearance in September, 1917. Guynemer’s SPAD aircraft were Hispano-powered and -armed, and Guynemer was said to be a personal friend of Birkigt.

The Hisso flying stork was sculpted by Parisian artist Frederic Bazin. Fascinated by speed and flight, perfect for the art-deco era, Bazin designed numerous car mascots, including Isotta Fraschini’s “Spirit of Triumph” and French manufacturer UNIC’s centaur.
Quelle: www.classicdriver.com; Jeff Koch - blog.hemmings.com
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Анастасия
Freitag, 27. September 2013
сколько стоит значок аиста сегодня?
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