| |
Deutsch

Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты

Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Fritz von Opel in his rocket powered racer, 1928
Fritz von Opel in his rocket powered racer, 1928
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel RAK 2 (1928): Рекорд автомобиля-ракеты
Opel Rak 2 rocket car, at Avus
Opel Rak 2 rocket car, at Avus
Opel Rak 2 rocket car, at Avus
Opel Rak 2 rocket car, at Avus
Bilder: GM
Bewertung:  3    -0    +3
23 мая 1928 года, Фриц Опель — внук Адама Опеля, на ракетном автомобиле Opel RAK 2, в присутствии почти трех тысяч приглашенных гостей, собравшихся на берлинской трассе AVUS, развил фантастическую по тем временам скорость — 238 км/ч.

Отличительная особенность этой модели — на ней впервые в мировой практике было применено антикрыло (по обеим сторонам машины были установлены крылья, прижимающие автомобиль к дороге). В этой области Опель является пионером - только в середине 20 века антикрылья стали более активно применять в автоспорте.


The response of most carmakers to plans for a rocket-powered car would have been frosty. But Fritz von Opel was fascinated by the theories of Max Valier, inventor and author of The Advance Into Space, and in 1927 agreed to help him create just such a vehicle.

The Opel company’s research department was assisted by rocket scientist Wilhelm Sander. They produced the “Rakentenwagen” (or RAK 1), equipped with solid fuel rockets. At Opel’s Russelshiem test track in April 1928, the car reached 62mph (100kph) in just eight seconds. The car was then radically redesigned as the RAK 2, with huge wings on either side to counteract any tendency to leave the ground. It was equipped with 24 cluster-powder rockets, calculated to give 13,228lb (6,000kg) of thrust. At Berlin’s Avus race track on May 23, the crowd went wild when Opel reached 148mph (238kph).

“Rocket Fritz” made headline news worldwide, amid speculation that the technology could transform world travel. The publicity worked wonders. It probably sweetened General Motors’ buy-out of the Opel family’s carmaking interests in 1928 – they received $66.7 million.
Quelle: www.automobile-age.info
Diskutieren
Autor
E-mail
Kommentieren