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Pierce-Arrow Advertising Art by Guernsey Moore (1913–1914)

Pierce-Arrow Ad (1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (August–September, 1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (August–September, 1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (September, 1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (September, 1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (November, 1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (November, 1913) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (December, 1913 – January, 1914) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (December, 1913 – January, 1914) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (February–March, 1914) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
Pierce-Arrow Ad (February–March, 1914) - Illustrated by Guernsey Moore
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Guernsey Moore (1874–1925)

Guernsey Moore studied at the Germantown Academy before attending the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1899, along with J. J. Gould, he helped redesign the format of the Saturday Evening Post changing it from a tabloid to a well-illustrated magazine widely known for its artwork and two-color, poster style covers. Moore’s style of painting contained heavily outlined images that were strongly symmetrical, reminiscent of the ongoing Arts and Crafts movement. He later worked designing costumes and decorations for pageants as well as painting several murals.


For 1913, the cars now offered electric headlights, although the trademark fender-mounted headlights did not appear until 1914. The 1913 cars also had a self-starter of the compressed air variety. An electric starter was used in 1914. The 1913 cars, known as Series One, had grown from the 1910 versions. The 38-C-1 (formerly the 36-UU) now had 132 inch wheelbase; the 48-B-1 was stretched to 142 inches; and the 66-A-1 was mounted on a 147 1/2 inch wheelbase. The engine in the 66 had also grown to a 5x7 bore & stroke. This pushed the displacement to 824 cubic inches, t e largest production automobile engine ever made.
Quelle: www.thekellycollection.org; www.pierce-arrow.org
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