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The Crawford Collection (TRW'79): Portfolio by William J. Sims

1904 White Model D Touring: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1904 White Model D Touring: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1906 Krieger-Brasier Electric Landaulet: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1906 Krieger-Brasier Electric Landaulet: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1912 Sandusky 1½ Ton Stake Truck: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1912 Sandusky 1½ Ton Stake Truck: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1913 Alco Six Berline Limousine: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1913 Alco Six Berline Limousine: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1914 Peerless Model 60-Six Seven Passenger Touring: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1914 Peerless Model 60-Six Seven Passenger Touring: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Dual Cowl Phaeton: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Dual Cowl Phaeton: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1929 Ford Model A Station Wagon: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1929 Ford Model A Station Wagon: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1930 Auburn Model 8-95 Cabriolet: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1930 Auburn Model 8-95 Cabriolet: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1932 Cadillac Model 355B Phaeton: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1932 Cadillac Model 355B Phaeton: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1935 Mercedes-Benz 500K Cabriolet A: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1935 Mercedes-Benz 500K Cabriolet A: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1939 Buick Roadmaster Sedan: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1939 Buick Roadmaster Sedan: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1956 Continental Mark II: Illustrated by William J. Sims
1956 Continental Mark II: Illustrated by William J. Sims
Bilder: Thompson Ramo Wooldridge, Inc.
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Set of 12 automotive illustrations by the artist William J. Sims.
Special folio issue of the 12 prints that were also pictured in the Thompson Ramo Wooldridge, Inc. calendar for 1979. This year's calendar pictures 12 cars from the collection of over 200 antique autos, aircraft and accessories found in the Frederick C. Crawford Museum in Cleveland, Ohio. Crawford, a former CEO of TRW, started collecting cars in 1937 and passed his collection to the Western Reserve Historical Society in 1964 with the founding of the museum.

1. 1904 White Model D Touring

In the early days of the auto, many kinds of power plants were tested. Most were discarded in favor of the internal combustion gasoline engine. The steam car was such power plant. This 1904 White Model D Touring car was manufactured by the White Sewing Machine Company of Cleveland, Ohio. With two steam cylinders generating 10 hp., it could cover 100 miles before requiring fuel or water. Although the White cars had proved themselves by winning in the Glidden Tours, which were annual reliability contests, the last of the steamers appeared in 1910. At that time the White company changed all production to the internal combustion gasoline engine.

2. 1906 Krieger-Brasier Electric Landaulet

The electric car presented another alternative to the internal combustion engine. The 1906 Krieger Brasier Electric Landaulet was powered by storage batteries emitting 68 volts to individual motors over each front wheel. The auto was manufactured by the Compagnie Parisienne des Voitures Electriques Krieger (1897-1909) of Paris, a company which refused to submit to automobile designs, preferring the designs of more elegant horse-drawn carriages and coaches. A 1906 Krieger was donated to the Crawford Auto Museum and is one of two in existence - and the only one in this country

3. 1912 Sandusky 1½-Ton Stake

As the automobile developed, the need for cargo carrying vehicles became clear. To meet this need the first trucks were designed, basically by attaching a flatbed cart to a modified car. One of the early refinements to trucks was the introduction of a removable engine by the Sandusky Auto Parts and Motor Company of Sandusky, Ohio, in 1912. This 1912 Sandusky is a 1½ ton stake truck. Its 4 cylinder engine, transmission, radiator and fuel tank were assembled as a unit that could be removed quickly from the truck to facilitate repairs. This Sandusky was a gift to the Crawford Auto Museum by Henry Austin Clark, Jr. of Cleveland and is possibly the only one in existence.

4. 1913 Alco Six Berline Limousine

In 1906 the world's largest manufacturer of railway engines, the American Locomotive Company, entered the automobile industry. The company's early autos, called American Berliets, were produced under a license from Automobiles M. Berliet in France. The license was dropped in 1909 and the subsequent autos were named Alco. By keeping the production limited, emphasis was placed on trouble-free performance, comfort and beautifully styled bodies. Despite the quality of the auto, the last Alco appeared in 1913. This 1913 Alco Six is the sole remaining closed model. Only seven open Alcos are known to exist.

5. 1914 Peerless Model 60-Six 7-Passenger Touring

Peerless - All that the name implies - was a slogan and a claim the Peerless Motor Car Corporation could easily fulfill. Until its demise in 1932, the company was among the premier manufacturers of quality and luxury automobiles. This 1914 Peerless Model 60-Six, a seven passenger touring car, was the largst Peerless model ever produced, powered by the largest engine offered in an American passenger car. Of the 58 Model 60 Six cars produced in 1914, the Crawford Auto Museum car is the only known existing model. It was one of 50 antique autos that participated in the Spirit of '76 Transcontinental Reliability Tour, a 3200 mile tour form Seattle to Philadelphia commemorating the nation's bicentennial. The 1914 Peerless was one of 46 participants that completed the tour.

6. 1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Dual Cowl Phaeton

Classic cars, distinguished for their fine design, engineering and superior workmanship, include this 1928 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Dual Cowl Phaeton. It is one of a body style, originally built by the famous Barker coachbuilders. In 1963 Irving F. Jensen, Jr., of Sioux City, Iowa, purchased the Phantom I, completely restored it, and donated it to the Crawford Museum in 1976. An interesting feature of the auto is the lighting. Its Barker dippers can be raised or lowered to illuminate the roadway without distracting oncoming motorists. In addition, smaller pilot rays move right and left with the wheels for better vision rounding curves. At an original cost of $19,000, the 1928 Phantom was also equipped with a German silver radiator.

7. 1929 Ford Model A Station Wagon

The first station wagon was produced in 1923 by the Star Motor Company to serve as a passenger car or a utility truck with plenty of luggage space. The body style was an instant success and has retained its popularity to this day. Ford introduced its first station wagon among the dozen body styles available on the 1929 Model A. Nicknamed the 'Woodie' because of its roomy maple-wood body, the wagon could accommodate seven passengers. Only a handful of original Model A station wagon bodies are still in existence.

8. 1930 Auburn Model 8-95 Cabriolet

The original factory salesroom of the Auburn Company is still standing in Auburn, Indiana, as a tribute to one of the leading American automakers of the 1930s. Begun in 1900 by the Eckhart brothers, the Auburn Company joined the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg empire in 1924. When E.L. Cord bought Auburn, he completely redesigned the line with low and sleek lines, a two-toned color scheme with the characteristic curved molding on the hood, outside exhaust pipes, and a high performance straight eight Lycoming engine.

9. 1932 Cadillac Model 355B Phaeton

In the year 1932 classic car body design reached its peak before streamlining and envelope bodies appeared. This 1932 Cadillac Model 355B Phaeton is typical of that body design and is powered by the popular V-8 engine. V-12 and V-16 engines were also available. 1932 Cadillacs are among the finest examples of Cadillac cars and very few 1932 Cadillacs are known to exist. The 1932 Cadillac is pictured here with one of the most famous racing airplanes, the Number II GeeBee Senior Sportster, piloted by Jimmy Doolittle. This airplane won the Thompson Trophy at the 1932 Cleveland National Air Races.

10. 1935 Mercedes-Benz 500K Cabriolet A

Beginning in the '30s, Mercedes-Benz designed a wider gap between its racing cars and luxury models. The 1935 Mercedes-Benz 500k Cabriolet A was one of the new luxury models, with flowing body lines and independent four-wheel suspension to assure a smooth ride on any surface. The 500K series cars were limited edition models offered in nine body styles and designed by Hans Nibel, who also designed the famous Blitzen Benz. A straight eight engine with overhead valves powered the 500K series. The engine was equipped with a supercharge that would engage when the accelerator was floored. Only 354 of the 1935 Mercedes 500K were produced.

11. 1939 Buick Roadmaster Sedan

'Buick's the Beauty' was the slogan that introduced Buick's 1939 model year. Although the 1938 models had been very popular, Buick made a number of design changes in the '39 models, which are considered by some designers to be the most attractive cars of the times. As evidenced in this 1939 Buick Roadmaster Sedan, the front of the car was reshaped to reflect the new placement of the radiator where the most outside air could be forced onto it. Directional signals also became standard equipment for the first time in 1939.

12. 1956 Continental Mark II Hardtop Coupe
In 1939 Edsel Ford introduced his dream car, the Continental, with styling based on clean classic lines, including the latest technological advances, and with maximum interchangeability of chassis parts with the Lincoln models. The Continental line was discontinued in 1948 but revived in 1956 with the Mark II. It had a sculptured body design and was powered by a V-8 overhead valve engine.
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