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1962 Rambler (Budd) XR-400

Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Rambler (Budd) XR-400, 1962
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963 - From the Collections of The Henry Ford
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963 - From the Collections of The Henry Ford
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963 - Interior
Budd XR-400 Concept Car, 1963 - Interior
Images: www.shorey.net; www.conceptcars.it; Collections of The Henry Ford - www.thehenryford.org
Rating:  16    -4    +20
In 1962 Budd made a prototype called Budd XR400 powered by a 270 hp V8 engine. However the design was rejected by AMC.

The caption on 1-st photo (provided by Curt Hall) in Automotive Industries (July 1996) states: "The 1963 XR-400 prototype for Rambler provided extra passenger space behind the front seat. The fully operational XR-400 was a frequent feature in parades."

www.amxfiles.com


The Budd Company approached American Motors Corporation in 1962 with this concept car, which placed a stylish body and a powerful V-8 on an inexpensive Rambler Ambassador chassis. AMC demurred, fearing the car would fail. Two years later, Ford introduced the successful Mustang, which followed the same basic idea of a sporty new body on an existing platform.

Collections of The Henry Ford
Other Rambler
1956 Rambler Palm Beach (Pininfarina), 1962 Rambler (Budd) XR-400
Comments
Roger
Wednesday, February 13, 2008
If Rambler had made cars like this for the public, they would still be in business
Carl
Monday, December 6, 2010
From the back it reminds me of the first Mustangs. This is much sportier than regular Ramblers, especially in 1962 (!) and has a European sportscar feel that I think Americans would have gone for.
amcramblermarlin
Wednesday, January 5, 2011
AMC did not go out of business; Chrysler purchased stock to gain corporate control. More education shows how AMC took over internal controls of Chrysler, then the public became served with cars such as the Prowler and Viper. AM General is still an independent. AMC did make the '68/70 AMX, while Ford did not make the mid-engined two seater Mustang they originally teased the public with. Neither was the Camaro or Firebird the original Banshee sports car idea.
VanillaDude
Thursday, July 28, 2011
While this would have been a logical and probably successful direction for AMC, AMC management after Romney did not want to keep Rambler. Having their roots in Nash and Hudson, these post-Romney guys wanted to emulated their competition and compete in all markets. So they took the profits Rambler gave them and squandered it on full size and intermediate sized cars which failed to sell. By 1966, AMC was broke.

It took a Federal Government bailout in the form of Post Office purchases to clear out AMC's backlots and give them enough cash to last the rest of the decade. From 1966 on, AMC was not a successful niche market player, but a weak auto maker.

AMC ignored Rambler until they were out of business.
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