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1982 GM Lean Machine

GM Lean Machine, 1982
GM Lean Machine, 1982
GM Lean Machine, 1982
GM Lean Machine, 1982
GM Lean Machine, 1982
GM Lean Machine, 1982
Images: Concept Car Central; www.lostepcot.com
Rating:  21    -15    +36
General Motors claimed the Lean Machine was the only new style of road vehicle invented during the 20th century. Named for is slender silhouette and tilting capabilities, the Lean Machine look like, and weighed as mush as, a motorcycle. It could accelerate from 0-60 miles per hour in 6.4 seconds, and could travel up to 200 miles per gallon. With one wheel in front, two wheels in back, and a closed cabin made of fiberglass and plastic, General Motors planned not to make the Lean Machine resemble a motorcycle in too many ways, and avoided the requirement of propping the vehicle upward with a bar by adding an extra wheel at the rear. The elongated passenger pod, pivoting at either end above the power pod, rotated horizontally and separately from the lower body unit. Pedals controlled the rotation, enabling the driver to lean into a turn as motorcyclists do to move inward with the center of gravity. The passenger compartment included protection during adverse weather conditions. Steering, braking, and throttle controls were combined in handlebars while an automatic transmission linked to a rear-mounted, liquid-cooled, 30-horse power engine shifted gears.

Concept Car Central


The GM Lean Machine was developed by Frank Winchell of General Motors (USA) in the early 1980’s as a concept car. The single seater vehicle is a "lean" machine in the true sense of the word as it leans into corners like a motorcycle whilst keeping the stability of a normal car. The original model was powered by a 15 hp 2-cylinder engine that produced a maximum speed of 80 mph with a fuel economy of 80 mpg at 40 mph. Shortly afterwards a second model was produced that was powered by a larger 38 hp engine. With a total body weight of 159kg this gave the vehicle outstanding performance and the Lean Machine was able to reach 60 mph in just 6.8 seconds with a fuel economy of over 200 mpg.

For the futuristic 1993 movie "Demolition Man" starring Sylvestor Stalone and Wesley Snipes the GM Lean Machine was one of seventeen concept cars produced by General Motors to be featured in the film with an insurance value of $69 million.

www.3wheelers.com
Comments:
Jake Dickson
Thursday, February 07, 2008
I've heard it can go over 200 mpg and can reach a maximum speed of 75-80 mph. I really want to get one of those three wheelers. It would be awesome because you could feel like you are going to fall over in the car but your'e not. Gm had the best idea EVER!!!!!!!!!
Sean Smith
Monday, March 24, 2008
you can get these now, the Carver is the closest to this you'll find, a 3 wheeler which leans like a motorbike

http://www.carver-worldwide.com
Jaybird
Monday, February 16, 2009
I can never understand why GM did not license the technology for this to some manufacturer willing to make it.

It was a great idea, and is now perfect for the times.

Perhaps in the great GM asset sale to come, someone will pick this up and make it.
Help
Sunday, May 17, 2009
http://www.flytheroad.com
I want to make this
Tuesday, July 28, 2009
I would love to manufacture this.

casablancavic@gmail.com
Californian
Sunday, September 06, 2009
"200 mpg"... instead, fuel economy was kept at 15 to 27 mpg, and in order the secure oil the USA Federal Government kills over 2 million Arabs in Iraq... this vehicle would have been a true "peoples car", it would have sold millions across the world... India, China, Spanish America... WOW!
thomas lewis
Monday, January 30, 2012
A dutch company manufactures the Carver,which is very close in design.BMW had the Clever,which performed very well in both the highway and crash test's.In the next 5 -10 years,you will start to see enclosed 2 and 3 wheel vehicles manufactured by a multitude of companies,and that good thing.Streamlined narrow vehicles can pull some big number's in mileage and are a blast to drive
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