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Ford Performance Models Advertising Art (1970)

Ford Torino Cobra-429 Drag Pack Ad (January, 1970): Striking Power!
Ford Torino Cobra-429 Drag Pack Ad (January, 1970): Striking Power!
Ford Torino Cobra Ad (November, 1969): '70 Cobra–This one makes track!
Ford Torino Cobra Ad (November, 1969): '70 Cobra–This one makes track!
Ford Mustang Mach 1 Ad (October, 1969): '70 Mach 1–quickest pony of them all!
Ford Mustang Mach 1 Ad (October, 1969): '70 Mach 1–quickest pony of them all!
Ford Torino GT Ad (1969): '70 Torino GT–beautiful way to go!
Ford Torino GT Ad (1969): '70 Torino GT–beautiful way to go!
Ford Torino GT Ad (1970): Winner of Motor Trend's "Car of the Year" Competition
Ford Torino GT Ad (1970): Winner of Motor Trend's "Car of the Year" Competition
Ford Torino Cobra Ad (March, 1970): Torino Cobra–Striking Power!
Ford Torino Cobra Ad (March, 1970): Torino Cobra–Striking Power!
Ford Mustang Boss 302 Ad (March, 1970): Boss 302–The Ground Groover!
Ford Mustang Boss 302 Ad (March, 1970): Boss 302–The Ground Groover!
Ford Mustang Boss 302 Ad (1970): Boss 302–The Ground Groover!
Ford Mustang Boss 302 Ad (1970): Boss 302–The Ground Groover!
Ford Mustang Boss 302 Ad (1969?): '70 Boss 302–Son of Trans-Am
Ford Mustang Boss 302 Ad (1969?): '70 Boss 302–Son of Trans-Am
Ford Mustang Mach 1 Ad (April, 1970): Mach 1–pronounced Mach Won!
Ford Mustang Mach 1 Ad (April, 1970): Mach 1–pronounced Mach Won!
Images: SenseiAlan Photostream; wildaboutcarsonline.com
Rating:  5    -0    +5
1970 TORINO

For years, the Ford Fairlane kept a tight lid on its performance capabilities. It wasn’t until 1968 that a cool product name called Torino was chosen to market the racier offerings. Torino joined the fastback club that year with a backlite that approached the horizontal plane. Then in 1970, Torino had a complete makeover which changed the character of the car. The track victories of Foyt, Yarborough and the Wood Bros prepared cars highlighted a winning combination of high horsepower, endurance and svelte styling. Ford decided to take the formula to the street in a bold, blatant manner unlike anything previous Torinos had.

With bold Grabber colors, Motorwheel chromed mags, a shaker hood and vibrant side decals, a Cobra 429 CJ was hard to miss. Despite what the advertising shows, Torino Cobras weren’t only available in yellow. Grabber was the term Ford used for their Day Glo colors. Grabber Blue, Green and Orange were the extra cost colors in 1970. Also high visible, but not Grabber were Calypso Coral, Yellow and Red.

1970 MACH I

The 1970 Mach I was virtually identical to the 1969 version. The Mustang Mach I was similar to a GT fastback but had different stripes and came with a more upscale interior.

Some of the features included were a blacked-out hood treatment, reflective body side tape stripes, chrome rocker panels molding, hood pins, a front spoiler attached to the front roll pan, a nonfunctional hood scoop with turn signal indicators on the back side, an engine designation badge on the side and accent stripes around the upper portion of the rear body panel. The Mach 1 also came with high-back bucket seats. A spoiler and window louvers were an available option, though they did not come standard.

The new Mach I Mustang included the previous engine options of 200cid I-6, 302cid and 390cid V-8 engines as well as the new option of a 351cid V-8. There was also the option of a 428cid big block as a 335 hp cobra jet V-8 with or without ram-air. In 1970, only 857 Mach I models were equipped with the Super Cobra Jet/Drag Pack. The name Cobra Jet came from the fact that the vehicle shook when the engine started or was revved.

A few upgrades were added to complement the new engine options. These included an optional shaker hood scoop, in place of the nonfunctioning scoop, and a vacuum-operated door that opened when the throttle was floored to allow air into the carburetor.

1970 BOSS 302

The 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 302 was a high performance model produced in 1969 and 1970 for the Trams- Am racing series. The world Boss was chosen because it was a hip and contemporary word from the 1960's that describes "The Best".

The Boss 302 Mustang was designed by Larry Shinoda. The distinctive styling included optional black horizontal rear window shades and blackout hood treatment. It was one of the first production cars with a front spoiler and rear deck wing. A total of 7,013 1970 models were produced and were offered for $3,720. In Trans-Am racing Ford entry was the 1969-70 Boss 302 Mustangs. The factory effort was headed up by the famed Bud Moore, who fielded two cars in the 1970 season, and won the championship that year.

In 1970, the Ford Mustang Boss advertising were featured as two page magazine spreads and one page ads as well. All advertising made excellent visual association with production Mustangs and their Trans-AM and drag -racing connections. Mustang Trans-Am advertising mostly appeared in Road and Track and Car and Driver magazines and is highly collectible today.
Source: phscollectorcarworld.blogspot.com; classicmustang.com; www.motorcities.org
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