Lincoln Advertising Art (1924–1926)

Lincoln Ad (1924) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom
Lincoln Ad (1924) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom
Lincoln Ad (1924) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom
Lincoln Ad (1924) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom
Lincoln Ad (November, 1924): Limousine - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom
Lincoln Ad (November, 1924): Limousine - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom
Lincoln Ad (1924): Roadster - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (1924): Roadster - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (1924): Sedan - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (1924): Sedan - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (August, 1924): Sedan - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (August, 1924): Sedan - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (January, 1925) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (January, 1925) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (February, 1925): 4-Passenger Coupe - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (February, 1925): 4-Passenger Coupe - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (March, 1925): Touring Car
Lincoln Ad (March, 1925): Touring Car
Lincoln Ad (1925): Touring Car - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (1925): Touring Car - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (June, 1925): Dual-Cowl Touring Car - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (June, 1925): Dual-Cowl Touring Car - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1925): Club Roadster - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1925): Club Roadster - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1925): Berline by Judkins - Illustrated by Floyd Brink
Lincoln Ad (1925): Berline by Judkins - Illustrated by Floyd Brink
Lincoln Ad (1925): - Illustrated by J. Karl
Lincoln Ad (1925): - Illustrated by J. Karl
Lincoln Ad (September, 1925) - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (September, 1925) - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (October, 1925) - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (October, 1925) - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (November, 1925): 4-Passenger Sedan - Illustrated by Floyd Brink
Lincoln Ad (November, 1925): 4-Passenger Sedan - Illustrated by Floyd Brink
Lincoln Ad (1925): Fully Collapsible Cabriolet by Holbrook - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1925): Fully Collapsible Cabriolet by Holbrook - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (January, 1926): Cabriolet by Brunn - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (January, 1926): Cabriolet by Brunn - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (February, 1926): 7-Passenger Sedan by Dietrich - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (February, 1926): 7-Passenger Sedan by Dietrich - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (March, 1926): 4-Passenger Sedan by Le Baron - Illustrated by Floyd Brink
Lincoln Ad (March, 1926): 4-Passenger Sedan by Le Baron - Illustrated by Floyd Brink
Lincoln Ad (April, 1926): Sport Phaeton by Brunn - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (April, 1926): Sport Phaeton by Brunn - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1926): 2-Passenger Coupe by Judkins - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (1926): 2-Passenger Coupe by Judkins - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (1926): Sport Roadster by Locke - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1926): Sport Roadster by Locke - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1926): Sport Touring by Brunn - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (1926): Sport Touring by Brunn - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (August, 1926): 5-Passenger Sedan by Dietrich - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (August, 1926): 5-Passenger Sedan by Dietrich - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (September, 1926) - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (September, 1926) - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (October, 1926): Club Roadster by Dietrich - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (October, 1926): Club Roadster by Dietrich - Illustrated by Fred Cole
Lincoln Ad (December, 1926) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (December, 1926) - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (January, 1927): Fully Collapsible Cabriolet by Holbrook - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (January, 1927): Fully Collapsible Cabriolet by Holbrook - Illustrated by Haddon Sundblom?
Lincoln Ad (1926)
Lincoln Ad (1926)
Иллюстрации: oldcarmanualproject.com; www.lov2xlr8.no; Paul Malon Collection; Alden Jewell Collection
Рейтинг:  4    -0    +4
Реклама автомобилей Линкольн модельного ряда 1924-26 годов. Прекрасно всё! От общей идеи и иллюстраций до типографики.

Художник Хэддон Сандблом - автор первых двух макетов серии, помимо прочего, оставил след в истории, изобразив в рекламной кампании Coca-Cola 1931 года Санта-Клауса толстяком в бело-красных цветах «кока-колы». Этот образ Санты впоследствии стал каноничным.

Искусствовед Роджер Т. Рид (Roger T. Reed), президент художественной галереи Illustration House, отмечал: "К Сандблому прочно приклеился ярлык художника, который нарисовал Санту для «Кока-Колы». Но эта трактовка слишком банальна, поскольку Сандблом являлся центральной фигурой для искусства рекламы XX столетия, и в большей степени, чем любой иной живописец проиллюстрировал, что такое американская мечта — ведь он работал практически для всех компаний из списка Fortune 500.


In the mid-1920s Lincoln had many advertisements using the general visual and content themes shown here. One factor that was not consistent was the artist doing the illustrations. Although Haddon Hubbard Sundblom (1899-1976) did some of this work, perhaps most were by Fred Cole. It is hard to tell which artist did any given illustration, because the artistic style is similar for the entire ad campaign, something surely imposed by the art director. What's not clear is whether the art director had this appearance in mind from the start or else liked what he saw in the work created by the initial artist and ordered it continued. In any case, that series was very attractive — more so than Lincoln's cars of the time.


Born in Muskegon, Michigan, Haddon Sundblom, whom his friends called "Sunny", became one of the most prominent American illustrators of the early 20th century and dominated that field in Chicago beginning in the 1920s. The original firm was Sundblom and Anderson and was located at 840 North Michigan Avenue before a move to 510 North Dearborn and then to Ontario Street with the name Sundblom, Johnston, and White.

He created many images that became famous for Coca-Cola such as their annual Santa Claus figure for which he sometimes used himself as the model. Other clients were Colgate, Maxwell House, Proctor and Gamble, etc. Voluptuous women, action figures, and bright, contrasting colors were a specialty.

In 1925, he formed his own teaching studio with Howard Stevens and Edwin Henry, and many of their students including Howard Terpning became well-known illustrators.

Sundblom credited Anders Zorn and John Singer Sargent as major influences.

He left school to work at the age of thirteen when his mother died, and took night classes and correspondence courses for many years to complete his education. He also studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the American Academy of Art. In 1987, he was elected to the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame.

From the late 1940s until 1954, he spent several of the winter months in Tucson, Arizona. One of his associates, Charles R. Showalter, reported that the paintings Sundblom sent back to the studio had "too much yellow" and that Sundblom "had trouble with the light in Arizona".

Of Sundblom's reported alcoholism, Showalter said that he did not drink on the job, but when he finished a painting, "he would go on a two-day bender, then come into the studio in a wrinkled suit coat, wash up, and get to work". He also reported that Sundblom painted fast, and ever instructed his students to 'loosen up' with their painting. His workers were instructed to strive for the look of having been done fast, even though it might take many hours.

Showalter had a very positive impression of his boss: "Sunny was terrific with all the artists that went through there. He gave everybody a real boost." (Olsen) Showalter also recalled that during the Depression, Sundblom was offered stock in Coca-Cola as a substitute for payment for work, but he declined saying that it was more important for his staff to be paid.
По материалам: artcontrarian.blogspot.com; www.askart.com
Обсудить автомобиль
Автор
E-mail
Комментарий