Peerless Advertising Campaign (1929)

Peerless Six-61 Standard Sedan Ad (1929): A Thoroughbred — through and through
Peerless Six-61 Standard Sedan Ad (1929): A Thoroughbred — through and through
Peerless Six-61 Ad (March, 1929): A Car That Challenges Comparison
Peerless Six-61 Ad (March, 1929): A Car That Challenges Comparison
Peerless Six-61 Ad (April, 1929): A Challenge!
Peerless Six-61 Ad (April, 1929): A Challenge!
Peerless Six-61 Roadster Ad (April, 1929): Whoopee!
Peerless Six-61 Roadster Ad (April, 1929): Whoopee!
Peerless Ad (May, 1929): The New Straight Eight-125
Peerless Ad (May, 1929): The New Straight Eight-125
Peerless Six-61 Roadster Ad (June, 1929): Boy! What a Roadster!
Peerless Six-61 Roadster Ad (June, 1929): Boy! What a Roadster!
Peerless Six-61 Ad (1929): Everything!
Peerless Six-61 Ad (1929): Everything!
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The Peerless Mfg. Co. completed its first car, a single cylinder Motorette, in November of 1901 with Louis P. Mooers as it chief engineer. The 1902 model had twin cylinders and ninty were sold. The company's name was changed to Peerless Motor Car Co. Four cylinders were used in the 1903 models.. For the next two years, heavy emphasis was placed on racing with Barney Oldfield as the driver. In 1905 Oldfield and Mooers left the company and with the hiring of Charles B. Schmidt, luxury automobiles were once again built. The Peerless was one of the Big P's. The slogan for the Peerless was " Built in America for American Roads" and later "All That the Name Implies", meaning that it had no peers.

The Peerless Motor Car Co., of Cleveland, Oh., has added to its 1905 line a 60-horsepower car, the motor of which is a duplicate of that used in the Peerless Green Dragon racing car used this fall on the track circuit by Barney Oldfield. The car is fitted with a Victoria body with hood for the rear seat, and is indeed a fashionable conveyance.

Throughout its history, Peerless lagged behind in sales to Cadillac and Pierce-Arrows, but it endured through many internal problems and management changes. In 1921 the company was sold to Richard Collins, the former president and general manager of Cadillac. Many of Cadillac's top level executives came with him. Peerless assests were $14,000,000.00 and all looked well. Sales soared where other companies were stumbling along. Even with this success, troubles continued and Collins and his team were out. This team would make the 1926 Pontiac. The peerless continued in business with different models until 1931, when it was decided that brewing a keg of Carling Black Label beer would be more profitable.
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