Rauch & Lang Electrics Advertising Art by C. Everett Johnson (1916-1917)

Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (October, 1916): Utility - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (October, 1916): Utility - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (November, 1916): Selection - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (November, 1916): Selection - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (December, 1916): Prestige - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (December, 1916): Prestige - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (1917): Quality - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (1917): Quality - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (1917): Comfort - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (1917): Comfort - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (May, 1917): Dominates - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (May, 1917): Dominates - Illustrated by C. Everett Johnson
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (May, 1917): Indispensable
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (May, 1917): Indispensable
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (1917): Distinction
Rauch & Lang Electrics Ad (1917): Distinction
Иллюстрации: Alden Jewell Collection; chuckstoyland.com; www.thejumpingfrog.com
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Реклама электромобилей Rauch & Lang модельного ряда 1917 года с иллюстрациями Чарльза Эверетта Джонсона (Charles Everett Johnson). Художником интересно обыгрывается белый фон, в то время как конкуренты из Milburn сделали акцент в своей рекламе на черный цвет.


Noted illustrator C. Everett Johnson drew several ads for Rauch & Lang in 1917. One depicted a brown Rauch & Lang outside and an interior scene with an ornate wall sconce, a fur-lined opera cloak and lady's purse lying on a richly brocaded chair, with fur-lined boots alongside it. On a side table rests a gentleman's top hat and gloves. The copy was short and direct: "Prestige. Millions own automobiles, but only comparatively few may enjoy the luxury of the Rauch & Lang electric. It is a standard of prestige — recognized universally — The Social Necessity." Another illustration was a snow scene with a blue Rauch & Lang Electric near a stone bench that ended in a large stone urn holding an evergreen shrub. On the bench are red ice skates, a red drawstring bag, crossed ice hockey sticks, and a black and white striped scarf. This time quality is the featured trait: "Quality buyers have always selected the Rauch & Lang as a matter of course. . . It is a luxurious treasure — beautiful, simple, dependable, silent and safe."

Another ad that year showed the front porch of a home with pet dog, traveling trunk, and hat box and highlighted the Rauch & Lang's distinction: "Sub-consciously every fortunate owner of a Rauch & Lang Electric realizes its many distinctive qualities. But the delights of Rauch & Lang beauty, luxuriousness in equipment, safety, and dependability of performance under all conditions, are constantly in mind." Another cited "Indispensable" as the watch word: "Sojourners in Florida and California are the fortunate ones who send on their Rauch & Lang Electric to multiply the pleasures of their season of change."

While Baker Rauch & Lang was the company name at the bottom of the ad, Baker's logo no longer appeared since all cars now produced were being marketed as Rauch & Langs. The ads were shiny and optimistic and the merger between Baker and Rauch & Lang had made it the world's largest electric car concern. While there were hopes that in playing to the strengths of the two concerns and streamlining operations, the company might prosper, one unsettling truth remained: Gas-powered cars clearly had the lead.


Charles Everett Johnson

Painter, commercial artist. Born in Gilroy, CA on Dec. 7, 1866. Johnson studied in Paris with Richard Miller (1909-13) followed by study at the AIC. He remained in Chicago for several years and was art director for the Lord & Thomas Advertising Agency. By 1925 he had returned to southern California and established a home in Altadena and a freelance studio in Los Angeles. He taught advertising art at Choulnard Art School and was active in Los Angeles until the early 1940s.
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