Stutz Advertising Art by Edmund Davenport (1927): The Improved New Safety Stutz

The Improved New Safety Stutz Brochure (1927): Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
The Improved New Safety Stutz Brochure (1927): Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
The Improved New Safety Stutz Ad (April, 1927): Vertical Eight Coupe - Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
The Improved New Safety Stutz Ad (April, 1927): Vertical Eight Coupe - Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
The Improved New Safety Stutz Ad (1927): Vertical Eight Coupe with Weymann Flexible Body - Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
The Improved New Safety Stutz Ad (1927): Vertical Eight Coupe with Weymann Flexible Body - Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
The Improved New Safety Stutz Ad (July, 1927): Vertical Eight Sedan by Le Baron - Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
The Improved New Safety Stutz Ad (July, 1927): Vertical Eight Sedan by Le Baron - Illustrated by Edmund Davenport
Иллюстрации: David Stafford Collection; periodpaper.com; Madison Ave.Collectables
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Stutz finally migrated to left-hand drive in 1922; initially on closed models only. And, as late as 1923, most Stutz bodies were open; an eternity compared to the rest of the industry. Hungarian-born Frederick E. Moscovics arrived at the end of 1925. As the new general manager, he was given a “clean sheet of paper” and over $1million to transform Stutz. He quickly scrapped the existing models and commissioned a completely new car. Known as the Vertical Eight with Safety Chassis, the new car featured a 92hp overhead cam straight eight designed by Swiss-born Charles Greuter. The chassis featured central lubrication, four-wheel hydraulic brakes, and an underslung worm drive which enabled low, sleek bodies. The advanced car used wire-reinforced glass in the windscreen giving credence to the “Safety” designation. Five body styles of Brewster-design were offered at one price - $2,995.00, considerably lower than previous models which cost as much as $4,785.00. Gone was the rough and raucous image of the Bearcat which was apropos for Stutz a decade earlier. Brute force was replaced with elegant refinement.

The car was an immediate success with more than $3 million in orders taken in a single day at the dealer’s convention in December 1925. Sales were a record 5,000 units in 1926 compared to 2,000 the year earlier. In 1928, engine output was increased to 115hp and a longer wheelbase model introduced in an effort to appeal to custom coachbuilders.
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